Connect with Adolescent
Close x white

Here’s what these Toronto girls think about fame

Aug. 28, 2017
Avatar crybaby logo.jpgadcb5a96 a5d2 4633 a5c6 04f0cec8538e

This article is part of a recurring Crybaby Zine feature in which Crybaby writers interview girls in different cities about topics relating to that month’s theme. For their Fame Issue, Maggie Wilde interviewed these Toronto girls on the subject of fame.  


GILL

What does fame mean to you?

I think that fame is the ability to reach a large group of people in one way or another, whether that be social media content, art or activism. I think it also means taking a lot of shit from people who don’t know you, like Perez Hilton.

Would you rather achieve fame or be respected by an inner circle of people that you respect?

Going to an art school has put me in a place where I am surrounded by people who think similarly to myself but still have room to be an individual, and it is definitely something that I am very comfortable with. As for the respect part, I think that's something that is imperative to being a human being right now, and probably a more important exchange than fame or large scale attention. Sometimes I think it would be nice to be famous though for a bit so I could get free stuff, but morals win most of the time.

Our culture often holds reality television stars and people well-known for their abundant wealth in high esteem. What does this say about our society as a whole?

Our society wants what they can’t have in general, so we put people who have these nice things on pedestals, even though we criticize them brutally most of the time, in public or in private. It’s definitely a distraction we use so we won’t have to reflect on ourselves with such scrutiny (like we probably should because things are shitty). I think it’s changing right now, though, because people are angry enough about situations other than the Kardashians and Real Housewives (which are both entertaining, sorry) to start trying to change things.


RAQUEL


Do you think our generation has a different definition of fame than previous generations have had, and if so, why?

I think today, the things people become famous for are definitely polar opposite of that years ago. It's almost easier, but also harder. Anybody determined enough or with enough money could easily become famous on some platform (Instagram, musical.ly, Tumblr). But worldwide or nationwide fame is very hard to achieve. People are far more judgemental nowadays. I think previous generations of famous people had a more laid-back, enjoyable fame ‘cause their lives weren't broadcasted in the hands of almost every person (via cell phones).

We are often taught about figureheads such as Marilyn Monroe and Kurt Cobain meeting their demise through an unbearable amount of fame and a loss of privacy. Do you think there is validity in the notion that too much fame can overwhelm a person’s being?

I think that's extremely valid. I cannot imagine having millions of people aware of my every move. There’s a lot of power in being famous that nobody but famous people can truly [access]. And it definitely has and can result in terrible things.

Do you think the prevalence of the internet has made it easier or more difficult to become prominent in pop culture?

It's definitely easier to advertise yourself and create a platform. In many ways it's easier to popularize yourself, and, yeah, sometimes that leads to fame. Nowadays it seems like there's so many people trying to be famous using the exact same tactics that it's hard to appear unique in pop culture.


LILY


Do you think our generation has a different definition of fame than previous generations have had, and if so, why?

I definitely think that fame has been redefined: there is less of a public emphasis on Hollywood and the use of tabloids. In previous generations, there were very few available resources to obtain information about anyone famous; there weren't the tools we have today which allow anyone to be an expert on someone they idolize. Things like fan pages, Snapchat stories, and the use of famous individuals for marketing have made fame much more achievable, and I would suspect that the number of people deemed “famous” has grown exponentially over time because of this over-saturation of information.

We are often taught about figureheads such as Marilyn Monroe and Kurt Cobain meeting their demise through an unbearable amount of fame and a loss of privacy. Do you think there is validity in the notion that too much fame can overwhelm a person’s being?

There is definitely validity in that statement. Not everyone with immaculate talent is built for handling the pressures and responsibilities of being famous. There are so many unfortunate cases (such as Lindsay Lohan, Britney Spears, Amanda Bynes, Brittany Murphy) where you see beautiful and talented women lose control or become ill due to the conditions which accompany a famous lifestyle. Fortunately, there seems to be shift in this situation. Famous people now have the ability to share whatever they choose through social media, which leaves a lot less room for the development of rumours and tabloids, which have previously been extremely destructive to famous people's mental and physical health. It's fairly standardized by now that fame comes at the cost of losing your ability to lead a private life: there are very few Hannah Montanas out there.

Do you think the prevalence of the internet has made it easier or more difficult to become prominent in pop culture?

I think the internet and social media have made it both easier and safer to become prominent in pop culture, because of your ability to curate the information you wish to share. It is also easier than ever to connect with others and to spread content. It'll be interesting to see what what will result from this abundance of famous individuals 10-20 years from now—if fame will become obsolete or remain a prominent force in our society. 


Adolescent is psyched to be able to bring this and other articles from the pages of Crybaby Zine to our readers. This piece was originally written for their Fame Issue—if you like it, check out their store to buy this or other issues!